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Counting the Cost
Land grabs: Threat or opportunity?
Farmers in Argentina are facing competition from foreign firms that want to buy or lease land to plant crops.
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2011 14:31

This week we look at food security and all that comes with it. The United Nations estimates that 70 per cent more food will be needed by the year 2050 to feed the world's growing population. Rising populations in China and India are demanding more food, making farmland the investment of choice.

Acquiring land to produce more food often results in so-called land grabs. But with 75 per cent of the world's population making their living from farming, buying land in foreign countries to feed your country's growing population is not always welcome by the locals. Are land grabs good business or is it morally questionable?

Also, free trade in the Americas: The US Congress has just passed free trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia and Panama, the biggest such deal in 17 years. Supporters say it could boost US exports by billions of dollars and create thousand of much needed new jobs.

And business in the Middle East: The region is booming, but you cannot just walk in and grab your slice.

 

Counting the Cost can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Friday: 2230; Saturday: 0930; Sunday: 0330; Monday: 1630.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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