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Counting the Cost
The cost of Libya's revolution
How much money has been spent on the battle against Muammar Gaddafi's regime?
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2011 17:25

After 42 years, Muammar Gaddafi's rule is considered all but over. But while the fighting goes on, the opposition National Transitional Council (NTC) is taking its first steps to becoming a fully fledged government.

To be effective in that role it needs money and if things go well for the NTC, it may just have that, and a whole lot more.

Many people have thrown a lot of money at the uprising in Libya, but now comes the time to find yet more money to rebuild the country and its economy.

There is a lot of work to do in getting Libya back on its feet, but the Transitional Council could be in an incredibly strong position: Libya has oil, it has no debts, and it has frozen assets worth between $110bn and $150bn.

Also as we mark World Water Week, we look at how supplying electricity to the people of East Timor is colliding with the country's underwater ecosystem.

And Apple CEO Steve Jobs, who founded and resurrected Apple into one of the world's most powerful brands, steps down. Shares in the company have taken a dive, so what now for Apple?

  

Counting the Cost can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Friday: 2230; Saturday: 0930; Sunday: 0330; Monday: 1630.

Click here for more on Counting the Cost.


Source:
Al Jazeera
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