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Harvest time

A poor Kurdish family travels across Turkey searching for farm-work in exploitative conditions.

Last updated: 30 Apr 2014 06:46
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Editor's note: This film is currently unavailable on Al Jazeera

An estimated million people earn their living as seasonal workers in Turkey, many of them ethnic Kurds and children.

The work is built on the exploitation of casual labour, and these seasonal workers have no benefits or insurance.

Living conditions are poor and transport is dangerous. This character-led, observational film tells the story of a family of 22, all living in a two-roomed house in the outskirts of the southeastern Turkish city of Batman.

The father is unemployed and has 18 children; two of them are disabled. It follows family members as they make the trip north to Cankiri for their five-month summer stretch on a lettuce farm.

(Note: this film's original title was 'Once Upon A Time'')

Al Jazeera World  can be seen each week at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2000; Wednesday: 1200; Thursday: 0100; Friday: 0600; Saturday: 2000; Sunday: 1200; Monday: 0100; Tuesday: 0600. 

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