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Al Jazeera Correspondent
Veronica Pedrosa: Imelda and Me
Veronica Pedrosa returns to the Philippines after her and her family were forced into exile in 1971.
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2011 12:51

The Philippines is one of the most dangerous places for journalists to report from. 

Al Jazeera correspondent Veronica Pedrosa takes a journey back to the country she was exiled from when she was just a child. It is also the country where she later began her 20-year career as a journalist.

We hear how her family, along with other dissidents, worked to overthrow the Marcos regime. And how the People Power uprising eventually toppled them from power. 

Today, Imelda Marcos is a congresswoman and her son Ferdinand Marcos Jr a senator. This, Pedrosa says, is an example of the culture of impunity that exists in the Philippines:

"In other words, the guilty going unpunished for their crimes. In 2009, the Philippines saw the worst mass killing of journalists that the world has ever seen; and yet a year-and-a-half later no one has been successfully convicted for those killings. 

"I wanted to find out what's really going on ... there's a very personal dimension for me." 

 

Imelda and Me airs from Thursday, September 22, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

Click here for more on Al Jazeera Correspondent.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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