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Al Jazeera Correspondent
Imelda Marcos: '... judged until infinity'
A telling insight into how Imelda Marcos justifies her controversial past.
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2011 12:49

Imelda Marcos, best known for her passion for shoes and her extravagant lifestyle, ruled over the Philippines as first lady, alongside her husband, President Ferdinand Marcos, for 16 years.

Their rule ended in 1986 when the people rose up to overthrow the regime and the Marcos family fled the country, seeking exile in Hawaii.

Ferdinand Marcos died in exile in 1989 and Imelda returned to her country soon after. Cleared of racketeering and fraud charges, she re-entered politics. 

In Imelda and Me, Al Jazeera's Veronica Pedrosa asks the former first lady about her own family, which was forced to leave the Philippines after her journalist mother wrote a book about Imelda.

Imelda responds: "I don't know. Even those people who wrote against me, I was always nice to them. I have no ill feeling about anybody. Even when they say something wrong about me ... Anyway, if I am at peace with the truth ... I'm not angry with the person, I'm sorry for them not seeing the truth."  

Avoiding answering the questions she is asked, Imelda instead chooses to focus on what a noble and successful man her father was and the hardships she has endured, saying: "More than life I value vindication and the truth. When you become president you enter history, and when you enter history you will be judged until infinity." 

 

Al Jazeera Correspondent airs each week at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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