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How to Stop a Multinational
Three Argentinians put themselves in harm's way as they try to stop a gold mining company destroying their environment.
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2011 09:02

Activists: Gabriela Romano, Jenny Lujan and Marcela Crabbe

Filmmaker: Rodrigo Vazquez

Argentinians are used to hitting the streets to start revolutions, fight for their rights or overthrow governments. But now people are taking to the streets to protect the country's valuable water sources up in the Andean mountains from multinational mining companies.

This film is made from within the anti-mining activist movement and will follow three teachers that have defeated a Canadian mining company and are now mounting a campaign against a Chinese one.

"Historically, this region's never had enough water, so when a mining company comes to use 1,000 litres of water per second, we risk becoming a ghost town, disappearing, because it doesn't make sense to stay in a town without water, and I don't want to leave.

I was born here, I love this land, and I will defend it."

Gabriela Romano, activist

Their preferred method of activism? Putting people on the streets to physically stop the heavy machinery from entering the town, training villagers and filming every protest.

 
How to Stop a Multinational airs from Tuesday, October 11, at the following times GMT: Tuesday: 2230; Wednesday: 0930; Thursday: 0330; Friday: 1630; Saturday: 2230; Sunday: 0930; Monday: 0330; Tuesday: 1630.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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