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101 East

Thailand in turmoil

As Thailand reels from its 12th military coup, what will it take to break the dangerous divide in this polarized nation?

Last updated: 27 Jun 2014 16:47
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Thailand’s army is in control again after the country’s 12th coup in 80 years.

Under the new regime, the constitution is suspended, protests are banned, there are strict media restrictions, and those accused of dissent face trial in military courts.

The new leader General Prayuth Chan-ocha says a decade of political turmoil between the popular Red Shirt movement and the wealthy elite was spiraling into civil war.

But those who support the deposed elected government and their patron, Thaksin Shinawatra, believe the army’s crackdown won’t work for long.

101 East explores the divisions tearing Thailand apart.

It’s the 12th #ThaiCoup. What will it take to end the political deadlock in #Thailand? Tell us @AJ101East

101 East  airs each week at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2230; Friday: 0930; Saturday: 0330; Sunday: 1630.  

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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