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101 East

Humanoids

The development of robots that could save lives is an unparalleled breakthrough, but what if they also could kill?

Last updated: 13 Jun 2014 09:58
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In May 2014, the UN held its first convention to debate whether killer robots should be banned. It was public recognition of how far designers have come in creating machines that could independently make the decision to kill, eliminating humans from the equation.

Nowhere did the debate resonate more loudly than Japan, the world leader in robotics. Spurred on by the Fukushima disaster, Japanese designers are leading a resurgence in intelligent, humanoid machines.

But while some innovators are creating them to save lives, critics fear others are building them to kill.

101 East asks could Japan’s latest generation of robots do more harm than good?

How well do you know your humanoids? Find out by taking our quiz.

Should Japan be allowed to create killer #robots? Tell us @AJ101East #humanoids

101 East  airs each week at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2230; Friday: 0930; Saturday: 0330; Sunday: 1630.  

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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