Pakistan is facing a myriad of domestic problems, including a plummeting economy, power shortages and cities beset with dysfunction.

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Since its independence in 1947, the country has swung violently between military rulers and civilian governments criticised for cronyism, graft and mismanagement.

The 190 million-strong population blame their woes on the current government led by the Pakistan People's Party. But two emerging powers have emerged on the horizon to hold them to account - the country's Supreme Court and an emerging opposition movement led by Imran Khan.

In June, the Supreme Court in Islamabad convicted Yusuf Raza Gilani, the then prime minister, of contempt and ousted him from office for not investigating the case. But the ruling Pakistan People's Party has remained defiant by electing controversial figure Raja Pervaiz Ashraf to the prime ministership.

The judiciary keeps mounting pressure on the Pakistani government to reopen old corruption cases against Asif Ali Zardari, the current president.

Analysts say the judiciary has been more effective than civilian government - giving political rights to minority groups, fixing traffic problems in Karachi and dictating the price of commodities like sugar.

101 East examines whether Pakistan's judiciary and opposition are real agents of change that can improve life in Pakistan.

101 East airs each week at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2230; Friday: 0930; Saturday: 0330; Sunday: 1630.

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Source: Al Jazeera