[QODLink]
101 EAST
Japan's whale hunt
High-seas clashes and international criticism has put country's hunts under the spotlight.
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2010 11:18 GMT



Japan's whaling fleet returned home in April from the Antarctic after conducting their annual whale hunt.

It was a difficult season, involving months of high-seas clashes with anti-whaling activists.

Japan's media has expressed frustration at the anti-whaling protesters, accusing them of acts of terrorism and claiming that eating whale is a deeply rooted cultural tradition among some Japanese.

Japan's annual whale hunt is allowed by the International Whaling Commission (IWC)as a scientific research programme, but opponents call it a cover for commercial whaling, which has been banned since 1986.

But international pressure against Japan's whaling is rising as the IWC tries to find a compromise before its meeting this month in Morocco.

On this edition of 101 East, we look at Japan's controversial whaling programme as the nation vows to continue the hunt.

This episode of 101 East airs from Thursday, June 10, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 1230; Friday: 0300; Saturday: 0530, 1730; Sunday: 0330, 1130; Tuesday: 1430; Thursday: 0630. 

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
Treatment for autism in the region has progressed, but lack of awareness and support services remains a challenge.
The past isn't far away for a people exiled from Crimea by Russia and the decades it took to get home.
New report highlights plight of domestic helpers in the United Kingdom, with critics comparing it to kefala system.
join our mailing list