Venezuela: No Money, Mo' Problems

Where did all the money go, and how did Venezuela come to where it is today?

    Venezuela used to be the richest country in Latin America, sitting on the world's largest oil reserves. Yet Venezuelans are scrambling for money, food and basic necessities.

    More than 100 people were killed in protests since April last year.

    In this episode of The Debrief, we ask: Where did all the money go, and how did Venezuela come to where it is today?

    Lucia Newman has been covering Venezuela for years. She tells us what she is seeing on the ground and what Venezuelans are saying to her. She has visited their homes and witnessed how they try to survive.

    On the show: Al Jazeera's Latin America Editor Lucia Newman. Our host is Jasmin Bauomy. Follow them: @lucianewman / @jasminbauomy

    Read more:

    Venezuela’s crisis: explained from the beginning

    Delcy Rodriguez: No humanitarian crisis in Venezuela

    How to subscribe

    iPhone / iPad:

    If you are reading this on your phone or tablet, tap here.

    In the Podcasts app, subscribe to The Debrief to get our new episodes.

    For other apps, here’s the RSS feed.

    Android:

    Subscribe and listen on SpotifyGoogle PlayStitcher and TuneIn.

    For other apps, here’s the RSS feed.

    Desktop / laptop:

    Find all our episodes here.

    Note: you’ll need to keep the browser window open to keep listening.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The Muslims of South Korea

    The number of Muslims in South Korea is estimated to be around 100,000, including foreigners.

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    Gender violence in India: 'Daughters are not a burden'

    With female foeticide still widespread, one woman tells her story of being mutilated for giving birth to her daughters.

    Zimbabwe: What's happening?

    Zimbabwe: What's happening?

    Situation tense as thousands march in Harare to call for Robert Mugabe's resignation days after military takeover.