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In Pictures
The dangers of electronic waste
 
Electronic waste, according to Green Peace, makes up "five per cent of all municipal solid waste worldwide". It is estimated that between 20 and 50 million tonnes of e-waste are generated yearly [CC - takomabibelot]
Chinese Greenpeace activists set up an e-waste sculpture at the China International High-tech exhibition in an effort to shame the companies attending the expo on May 23, 2005 in Beijing, China [Getty]
A Greenpeace activist is surrounded by security guards during a demonstration against e-waste outside the Hewlett Packard (HP) Beijing headquarters on December 7, 2005 in Beijing, China [Getty]
China is estimated to receive over a million tonnes of e-waste every year, the majority of which goes to Guiyu, where tens of thousands of workers manage and "recycle" the waste [CC - Bert van Dijk]
A worker rummages through e-waste for the purpose of salvaging metals and other materials for resale in Guiyu. E-waste is often illegally exported here from developed countries [EPA]
A worker takes down an old computer main frame to recover usable things in an e-waste recycling factory in Laixi, eastern China. China receives approximately 70 per cent of all e-waste generated yearly [EPA]
Sorting electronic waste in an alley behind Guangfu Lu on an autumn Saturday in Shanghai, China [CC - Remko Tanis]
India is one of the major hubs of the e-waste trade. According to a report from the Centre for Environmental Studies at Anna University in India, e-waste management in India suffers from "unhealthy conditions of informal recycling", among other criticisms [CC - Greenpeace India]
Workers dismantle old computers and electronics at E-Parisara, an electronic waste recycling factory. India's growing digital economy has contributed to the amount of e-waste it generates [Getty]
According to a Greenpeace report, tonnes of unusable electronics are shipped to Ghana and disposed of in scrap yards like this. Unprotected workers, often children, work in these hazardous conditions [EPA]
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The dangers of electronic waste /mritems/Images/2011/1/25/201112510543365784_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/2011125115121330876_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/201112584413299371_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/201112592326624833_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/2011125121931603797_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/201112512332197811_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/20111251285767427_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/2011125119577811_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/201112512308733811_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2011/1/25/2011125122612960876_8.jpg Electronic waste, according to Green Peace, makes up "five per cent of all municipal solid waste worldwide". It is estimated that between 20 and 50 million tonnes of e-waste are generated yearly [CC - takomabibelot];*;Chinese Greenpeace activists set up an e-waste sculpture at the China International High-tech exhibition in an effort to shame the companies attending the expo on May 23, 2005 in Beijing, China [Getty];*;A Greenpeace activist is surrounded by security guards during a demonstration against e-waste outside the Hewlett Packard (HP) Beijing headquarters on December 7, 2005 in Beijing, China [Getty];*;China is estimated to receive over a million tonnes of e-waste every year, the majority of which goes to Guiyu, where tens of thousands of workers manage and "recycle" the waste [CC - Bert van Dijk];*;A worker rummages through e-waste for the purpose of salvaging metals and other materials for resale in Guiyu. E-waste is often illegally exported here from developed countries [EPA];*;A worker takes down an old computer main frame to recover usable things in an e-waste recycling factory in Laixi, eastern China. China receives approximately 70 per cent of all e-waste generated yearly [EPA] ;*;Sorting electronic waste in an alley behind Guangfu Lu on an autumn Saturday in Shanghai, China [CC - Remko Tanis];*;India is one of the major hubs of the e-waste trade. According to a report from the Centre for Environmental Studies at Anna University in India, e-waste management in India suffers from "unhealthy conditions of informal recycling", among other criticisms [CC - Greenpeace India];*;Workers dismantle old computers and electronics at E-Parisara, an electronic waste recycling factory. India(***)s growing digital economy has contributed to the amount of e-waste it generates [Getty];*;According to a Greenpeace report, tonnes of unusable electronics are shipped to Ghana and disposed of in scrap yards like this. Unprotected workers, often children, work in these hazardous conditions [EPA] 0
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