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In Pictures
Kabul at Work
 
Day to day perceptions of the Afghan capital Kabul as shaped by the international news agenda portrays a city on the brink of collapse [David Gill]
Kabul is mainly regarded as city devastated by years of war, occupied by extremists, and with its citizens constantly threatened by random violence [David Gill]
Decades of foreign occupation and internal strife left the countrys economic infrastructure in ruins at the outset of the 21st century [David Gill]
Continuing internal strife severely hampered domestic and international efforts to rebuild the nation [David Gill]
But behind-the-scenes life for the many ordinary Kabulis continues as normal [David Gill]
Kabul is a city with a 4.5 million estimated population and more people are moving to the Afghan capital to work there [David Gill]
Zafar Ali, who works as the master sweetmaker in a small factory in Kabul, says that business was better under the Taliban because fewer people were making sweets [David Gill]
He says that under the Karzai regime more people have come into the business, prices for sugar are higher and profits ar not as good as they were before [David Gill]
In his opinion sweetmaker is not a good job for the next generation because chocolate is becoming more popular than the traditional sweets [David Gill]
General Khatooi Mohammadzai, the only female General in Afghanistan's army, was widowed after one year of marriage with her baby son, and without any support she had to look after herself [David Gill]
Women were banned from going to schools and colleges during the Taliban regime, but returned to schools and universities after 2001 [David Gill]
The cost of living has increased dramatically which is a problem for many Afghans [David Gill]
The Afghan government and business officials say the economic downturn has spread across a broad swath of the economy [David Gill]
The Darul Aman Palace was built by King Amanullah in the 1920s as he tried to modernise Afghanistan, but was destroyed during the civil war in the early 1990s [David Gill]
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Kabul at Work /mritems/Images/2010/9/19/2010919135440979621_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/201091914225369112_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/2010919135333633360_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/2010919135139270734_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/2010919135353228371_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/2010919135222881621_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/201091914210243621_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/2010919135032409734_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/201091914321886371_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/201091913505266580_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/20109191414755797_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/20109191353154621_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/2010919135112379734_8.jpg;*;/mritems/Images/2010/9/19/201091913527130580_8.jpg Day to day perceptions of the Afghan capital Kabul as shaped by the international news agenda portrays a city on the brink of collapse [David Gill];*;Kabul is mainly regarded as city devastated by years of war, occupied by extremists, and with its citizens constantly threatened by random violence [David Gill];*;Decades of foreign occupation and internal strife left the countrys economic infrastructure in ruins at the outset of the 21st century [David Gill];*;Continuing internal strife severely hampered domestic and international efforts to rebuild the nation [David Gill];*;But behind-the-scenes life for the many ordinary Kabulis continues as normal [David Gill];*;Kabul is a city with a 4.5 million estimated population and more people are moving to the Afghan capital to work there [David Gill];*;Zafar Ali, who works as the master sweetmaker in a small factory in Kabul, says that business was better under the Taliban because fewer people were making sweets [David Gill];*;He says that under the Karzai regime more people have come into the business, prices for sugar are higher and profits ar not as good as they were before [David Gill];*;In his opinion sweetmaker is not a good job for the next generation because chocolate is becoming more popular than the traditional sweets [David Gill];*;General Khatooi Mohammadzai, the only female General in Afghanistan(***)s army, was widowed after one year of marriage with her baby son, and without any support she had to look after herself [David Gill];*;Women were banned from going to schools and colleges during the Taliban regime, but returned to schools and universities after 2001 [David Gill];*;The cost of living has increased dramatically which is a problem for many Afghans [David Gill];*;The Afghan government and business officials say the economic downturn has spread across a broad swath of the economy [David Gill];*;The Darul Aman Palace was built by King Amanullah in the 1920s as he tried to modernise Afghanistan, but was destroyed during the civil war in the early 1990s [David Gill] 0
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