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Scores killed in Iraq bombings

At least 42 killed in bombings in Baghdad and Kirkuk, a day after deadly attack on mosque heightened sectarian tensions.

Last updated: 24 Aug 2014 06:09
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Bombings in Baghdad and the northern city of Kirkuk have killed at least 42 people in Iraq as the government investigated a deadly attack on a Sunni mosque the day before that has heightened sectarian tensions amid a fragile political transition.

In oil-rich Kirkuk, three bombs went off in a crowded commercial district, killing 31 people and wounding dozens, Kirkuk deputy police chief Tarhan Abdel-Rahman said on Saturday.

One witness said he heard "an explosion between the cars, and then we started carrying out the dead bodies from there while people were burning inside the shops and cars". The witness asked not to be named for fear of retribution.

In Baghdad, a suicide bomber had earlier driven an explosives-laden car into the gate of the intelligence headquarters in Karrada district, killing six civilians and five security personnel, a police officer said. He said 24 other people were wounded.

A medical official confirmed causality figures. Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity as they were not authorised to brief the media.

The attacks came after parliament speaker Salim al-Jabouri said that a committee of security officials and lawmakers were probing Friday's attack against a village mosque in Diyala province, northeast of the capital, which killed at least 73 people. The results of the investigation are expected in two days' time.

It remained unclear whether the attack in the village of Imam Wais was carried out by Shia militiamen or fighters from the Islamic State group who have been advancing into mixed Sunni-Shia areas in Diyala and have been known to kill fellow Sunni Muslims who refuse to submit to their harsh interpretation of Islamic law.

Since early this year, Iraq has faced an onslaught by the Islamic State group and allied Sunni fighters, who have seized large areas in the country's west and north. The group took over Iraq's second-largest city Mosul in June, and has since declared an Islamic state, or caliphate, in territory under its control in both Iraq and neighbouring Syria.

Local security officials in Diyala said Friday's attack began with a suicide bombing near the mosque entrance. Gunmen then stormed the building and opened fire on worshippers. 

Government formation

The attack led two major Sunni parliamentary blocs to pull out of talks on forming a new government. The move creates a major hurdle for Shia prime minister-designate Haider al-Abadi as he struggles to reach out to Sunnis to form a government by September 10 that can confront the Islamic State fighters.

In a press conference, al-Jabouri did not say who might have been behind the attack, saying only that such violence was "carried out by the same hands (of those) who want to derail the process of building the government."

Islamic State steps up recruitment campaign

Al-Jabouri heads one of the blocs that suspended talks, but he declined to comment on the move at the press conference, saying he was there in his capacity as parliament speaker. Al-Abadi issued a statement late on Saturday calling upon all political blocs to submit their nominations for ministerial positions in the new government.

Iraqi President Fouad Massoum, a Kurd, condemned Friday's attack and appealed "to all for self-restraint and to act wisely." He promised the incident would be "properly investigated and its perpetrators held to account."

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he was "deeply concerned about the impact such acts of sectarian violence will have on the already grave security situation and on the political process". The European Union said the "heinous crime" should not stand in the way of government formation and urged Iraqis to unite against violence.

Also Saturday, an explosion in the Kurdish capital, Erbil, injured three people, according to military officials who declined to be named because they are not authorised to speak with journalists. It remains unclear what caused the explosion, however one military official said it may have involved a sticky bomb.

Al Jazeera's Zeina Khodr, reporting from Erbil, said the explosion went off on a road near the office of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), a group which has recently engaged in fighting against the Islamic State group. 

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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