Deaths in bomb attacks in Baghdad area

At least 11 people killed in bombings at a busy Baghdad market and at a military checkpoint in nearby town of Taji.

    At least 11 people were killed in two separate bomb attacks in and near the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, local officials said.

    The first attack on Thursday struck Baghdad's Shorja Market, an open air emporium that is a popular place for residents to buy foodstuffs, clothes and electronics. Over the past decade, it has been a frequent target for bombings.

    A police officer said a bomb hidden on a wooden cart exploded near a Shia mosque in the market, killing at least four people and wounding 12, a police officer said. A medical official in Baghdad confirmed the casualty figures.

    The self-proclaimed jihadist group Islamic State claimed responsibility for the blast, saying on an affiliated Twitter feed that a man it called Abu Bakr al-Australi (the Australian) had detonated explosives in a vest he was wearing near the mosque.

    Baghdad has been on edge since the Sunni rebel blitz led by the Islamic State group seized the northern city of Mosul, vowing to push south to the capital.

    The city has seen several small scale bombings in recent weeks. On Wednesday nine people were killed in dual car bombing in al-Sadr City in east Baghdad.  

    The second bombing took place in the town of Taji, 20km north of the capital, where a suicide bomber detonated an explosive-rigged car at a military checkpoint, killing four soldiers and three civilians and wounded thirteen, a police officer said.

     

    SOURCE: Agencies


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