[QODLink]
Middle East

Egypt acts to end state of emergency

Court rules to lift three-month-old state of emergency but curfew to remain as military says it awaits executive order.

Last updated: 13 Nov 2013 05:58
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

An Egyptian court has ordered an end to the state of emergency, two days ahead of schedule and three months after it was imposed during a crackdown on protesters supporting ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

The cabinet said in a statement it would respect the ruling but would wait for official notification from the court before implementing it.

The state of emergency, accompanied by a night time curfew, had been scheduled to expire on Thursday.

It was imposed after a deadly crackdown by security forces on protest camps set up by supporters of Morsi, who was overthrown by the military on July 3 following mass rallies against his rule.

The state of the emergency allowed the authorities to make arrests without warrants and gave security officials the right to search people's homes.

The end of the state of emergency would mean the end of the 01:00-05:00 curfew also in place.

Al Jazeera's Rory Challands, in Cairo, said military officials there said they had not yet received an executive order to lift the curfew.

"They said they have to hear something from the prime minister before they lift it," our correspondent said.

Ongoing protests

The court decision comes despite the continued protests in different parts of the country.

On Tuesday, student supporters of Morsi rallied at the university in the Nile Delta town of Mansoura. Police fired tear gas to disperse protesters, witnesses said.

Egypt has seen a wave of demonstrations and violence since the army-led overthrow of Morsi.

Hundreds have been killed, mostly Morsi supporters, as well as about 100 security officers.

Morsi has been held in a secret location since his removal, and was transferred to a high-security prison in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria after the opening session of his trial on November 4.

He has so far declined legal representation and wanted to defend himself.

Morsi's son said his father was meeting on Tuesday with a team of lawyers who sought to defend him in his ongoing trial on charges of inciting murder.

The deposed leader, who has not yet agreed to let the team represent him, wanted to discuss with them taking legal action against others, his son said.

344

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.