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Mubarak's retrial resumes behind closed doors

Retrial of former Egyptian president, previously sentenced to life in jail, conducted away from public's eye.

Last Modified: 19 Oct 2013 16:30
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Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak is accused of complicity in the killing of demonstrators [File: AP]

A retrial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has resumed in a closed-door session, with senior security officials giving testimony, state television said.

Former intelligence chief Mourad Mowafy and the head of the national security authority, General Mostafa Abdel Naby, testified in Saturday's hearing, according to state television.

Mubarak was sentenced to life in prison last year after being convicted of complicity in the killing of demonstrators during the 2011 protests which led to his overthrow.

But following the toppling of Islamist President Mohamed Morsi, an appeals court ordered a retrial for Mubarak, releasing the 85-year-old former president from jail to house arrest in a military hospital in Maadi, a Cairo suburb. Last month the presiding judge barred the media from the sessions' proceedings for reasons of national security.

The military-backed government imposed a state of emergency after Morsi was overthrown in July.The army had removed Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president, after mass protests against his rule. His now-banned Muslim Brotherhood has described the move as a coup which reversed the gains of the Arab Spring revolution against Mubarak.

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Source:
Reuters
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