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Egypt's Mubarak appears in court

Former president's trial to resume on September 14 while that of Muslim Brotherhood leaders adjourned to October 29.

Last Modified: 25 Aug 2013 15:25
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Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian president, has appeared at his retrial on charges of complicity in the killings of protesters during the uprising that toppled him from power two years ago.

He was escorted by medical and security personnel on Sunday into an ambulance to be taken by helicopter from Maadi Military Hospital to the Cairo Police Academy, where he faced judges again before the trial was adjourned until September 14.

Mubarak's two sons and the former interior minister, Habib al-Adly, also appeared at the trial amid heavy security presence. The sons face charges of corruption while al-Adly is a co-defendant in the complicity case.

The judge ordered the creation of panels of experts to examine all charges. They will be sworn in at the next hearing, and will then have 30 days to investigate.

Al Jazeera's Wayne Hay, reporting from outside the academy, said Mubarak's initial appearance was procedural.

Mubarak, 85, was found guilty and sentenced to life in prison last year for complicity in the killing of about 900 protesters during the 18-day revolt against him in 2011.

He is being retried after his successful appeal against the previous conviction.

"The judge assured the public that the trial would be 'a very transparent process' and that people would be given access to the documents used as evidence in the case," our correspondent said.

Mubarak has been under house arrest after being released from detention last week.

Trial adjourned

Separately, the trial of Mohamed Badie, "spiritual leader" of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, and his two deputies, Khairat al-Shater and Rashad Bayoumy, was adjourned just minutes after it opened on Sunday.

The court adjourned the trial of the Brotherhood leaders and 32 other defendants till October 29 so that the defendants could be brought to court.

The men, who officials said did not appear in court for security reasons, are accused of inciting the murder of protesters.

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Follow our ongoing coverage of the political crisis in Egypt

Sunday's hearing was the first in the proceedings against the senior Brotherhood leaders, who were detained after the removal of President Mohamed Morsi from power by the military on July 3.

According to security sources, at least 2,000 Brotherhood members have been arrested since August 14.

The son of Mohamed El-Beltagi, a Muslim Brotherhood leader and former member of parliament, was arrested on Sunday along with four other former legislators in Beni Suef, in Upper Egypt.

They are accused of inciting violence, disturbing public peace and possessing arms.

On the same day, Dawoud Khairat, a close aide of Mohamed al-Zawahri, brother of al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahri, was detained on accusations of inciting violence, committing vandalism acts and belonging to a "terrorist group".

The Interior Ministry announced on Saturday the arrest of Mohye Hamed, an adviser to Morsi.

Hazem el-Beblawi, Egypt's interim prime minister, said on Saturday that his government was putting priority on increasing security to restore peace and improve the country's economy.

He also dismissed accusations that Mubarak's release was a return to Egypt's old political order.

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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