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Middle East

Israel frees Palestinian inmates before talks

Twenty-six prisoners freed overnight, as part of deal to enable resumption of peace talks, arrive in Ramallah and Gaza.

Last Modified: 14 Aug 2013 03:38
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Israel has released 26 Palestinian prisoners on the eve of renewed Middle East peace negotiations. 

Buses carrying the inmates, most of whom were held for attacks on Israeli citizens, left Ayalon prison in the centre of the country late on Tuesday.

Al Jazeera's Marwan Bishara assesses the upcoming Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations  

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas greeted the 11 Palestinian prisoners sent to Ramallah, in the occupied West Bank, while jubilant crowds met the other 15 in the Gaza Strip.

Israelis and Palestinians are set to relaunch talks in Jerusalem on Wednesday, following a preparatory round two weeks ago in Washington.

The prisoner release is part of an agreement to restart the talks after a five-year freeze.

The 26 inmates are the first of a total of 104 that Israel has promised to free within a year as part of a deal secured after months of shuttle diplomacy by US Secretary of State John Kerry, who has visited the region six times since March.

But Palestinian rights groups say that, upon close inspection, the deal is not the concession the Israelis are touting it to be.

Most of the detainees released on Tuesday have already served 20 years behind bars.

Al Jazeera's Sue Turton, reporting from Ramallah, said some of the prisoners had written to President Abbas and said that they did not want to be used as a bargaining chip in the talks.

Israeli protests

Disdain for the Palestinian prisoners is strong in Israel, where media have featured detailed accounts of their attacks on Israelis since a release roster was published two days ago. Palestinians, however, regard the men as heroes in a struggle for statehood.

Al Jazeera's Sue Turton reports from occupied East Jerusalem on Israel's approval of settlements

A small gathering of Israelis demonstrated outside the prison during the release. The protesters included family members of Israeli prisoners calling for the release of their relatives rather than the Palestinian inmates.

Meanwhile on Tuesday, Kerry called the Israeli prime minister to discuss settlement approvals Israel had announced earlier in the day. Palestinian officials have said that these announcements "threatened" talks with Israel.

Israel approved more than 900 new illegal settlement units near the Palestinian town of Beit Jala in occupied East Jerusalem, in addition to 1,200 settlement homes approved two days ago.

"At the end of the day, I think people realise that the prisoners were detained precisely because they wanted to stop Israeli control over Palestine," said Marwan Bishara, Al Jazeera's senior political analyst.

"So it's ironic that they are releasing [the prisoners] while they continue settlements."

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Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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