[QODLink]
Middle East

Security forces kidnapped in Egypt's Sinai

Unidentified gunmen kidnap three policemen and four army officers as security vacuum in troubled Sinai region continues.

Last Modified: 16 May 2013 11:37
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Egypt's government has been trying to re-establish state authority in Sinai following the 2011 uprising [EPA]

A group of unidentified gunmen have kidnapped seven Egyptian security officers in the Sinai Peninsula, near the border with Israel, security and Bedouin sources have said.

According to the sources, three policemen and four army officers who were riding in taxis travelling from Arish to Rafah cities, both in North Sinai, were stopped by armed men and kidnapped on Wednesday.

Police confirmed later on Thursday that one abductee was released and arrived at one of the security forces offices to relay the kidnappers' demands.   

It was still not yet clear who was behind the operation or their motives.

Egypt's government has been trying re-establish the state authority that collapsed in Sinai following the 2011 uprising against former president Hosni Mubarak.

Armed groups based mostly in North Sinai have exploited the vacuum to launch attacks both across the border into Israel and on Egyptian targets.

Tribesmen have frequently held tourists to demand the release of their relatives held on criminal charges.

In August last year, 16 Egyptian border guards were killed in an attack blamed on fighters who then hijacked an armoured
vehicle that they smashed across the border into Israel, where they were killed by Israeli forces.

Earlier this month, gunmen shot a man dead who was selling alcohol in Sinai. Last month, fighters fired two rockets from Sinai into Israel.

213

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.