[QODLink]
Middle East

Security chief of Egypt's North Sinai fired

General Ahmed Bakr relieved of his duties after a deadly attack on Saturday which killed three officers in El-Arish.
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2012 16:42

Egypt's interior minister has fired the security chief of North Sinai governorate after an attack killed three policemen in the regional capital on Sunday.

The interior ministry said on Sunday that General Ahmed Bakr was relieved of his duties, and replaced by General Sameeh Beshendi.

Three officers were killed and one wounded in Saturday's attack in El-Arish, which was likely carried out by Islamist fighters who Egyptian security forces have been hunting for in the region, according to security sources. 

The gunmen escaped following the attack and have not yet been identified by authorities. 

Dozens of policemen went on strike Sunday, blocking the main roads as the defence and interior ministers arrived. They demanded a stronger military campaign against the militants.

Egyptian forces launched the biggest security crackdown that the area near Israel has seen in decades following the killing of 16 border guards on August 5.

Disorder has spread in Sinai since Hosni Mubarak was ousted in a popular uprising last year, with fighters stepping up attacks on security forces near the Israeli border.

Mohamed Morsi, Egypt's new president, has pledged to restore security in the poor, desolate region.

182

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.