Australian sheep stranded in the Gulf

Two vessels carrying more than 70,000 sheep refused permission to dock by Bahrain and Kuwait due to infection fears.

    Australian sheep stranded in the Gulf
    Four million sheep every year board massive cargo ships bound for the Middle East [Getty]

    Two Australian ships holding thousands of sheep have been rejected from loading in Kuwait and Bahrain and remain at sea.

    The Australian ship Ocean Drover, carrying 22,000 sheep, has been blocked from unloading in Bahrain since the end of August.

    The sheep have already been on the water for 33 days.

    Kuwait has also rejected a shipment exported by the Australian company Emanuel’s on the Kuwaiti ship Al Shuwaikh. About 50,000 sheep are on board the ship that was due to dock a week ago.

    There are unconfirmed reports that the carrier is now moving its cargo to shore.

    According to the Australian agriculture department, the shipments are both infected with the disease scabby mouth.

    After the Cormo Express case, in which more than 5,000 sheep died, Australia signed memoranda of understanding with destination countries that oblige them to accept live exports into feedlots within 36 hours, including into quarantine, if needed.

    But the new cases suggest procedures for animal welfare in the live export trade have failed.

    Greens Senator Lee Rhiannon says the situation is unacceptable.

    "The memorandum of understanding now looks like worthless bits of paper," she said.

    "What they require is for the sheep to be unloaded within 36 hours of docking.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The Victorian Muslims of Britain

    The Victorian Muslims of Britain

    The stories of the British aristocrats who converted to Islam.

    Going undercover as a sex worker

    Going undercover as a sex worker

    A photojournalist describes how she posed as a prostitute to follow the trade in human flesh.

    India's shocking farmer suicide epidemic

    India's shocking farmer suicide epidemic

    Falling into a debt-trap and besieged by bad weather, thousands of farmers are taking their own lives each year.