[QODLink]
Europe
James Murdoch steps down from BSkyB
Son of Rupert Murdoch, once seen as heir to father's media empire, resigns as chairman of UK's top pay-TV company.
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2012 17:59

James Murdoch, under fire over his handling of a phone hacking scandal that forced the closure of Britain's top-selling Sunday newspaper, has stepped down from his role at the country's dominant pay-TV company.

The company announced on Tuesday that he would be replaced as chairman by Nicholas Ferguson, the previous deputy chairman. Murdoch remains a member of the BSkyB board.

Murdoch, who was previously chief executive of BSkyB, was dealt a heavy blow in November when more than 40 per cent of the company's independent shareholders failed to back his re-election as chairman.

Since then he has cut his ties with News Corp's British newspaper arm, and moved to the United States to take up
his new role running international pay-TV.

The 39-year-old son of Rupert Mudoch, once seen as heir to his father's company, has also continued to plead his innocence ahead of a parliamentary report investigating the phone hacking scandal, which is expected to be heavily critical of him.

News Corp's British newspaper division, News International, has admitted its News of the World tabloid hacked into the phones of crime victims, war dead and celebrities to generate stories.

It has since shut the 168-year-old paper and settled numerous court cases.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
In Brussels, NGO staff are being trained to fill the shortfall of field workers in West Africa.
Lawsuit by 6-year-old girl, locked up for a year, reignites debate over indefinite detention of 'boat people'.
Indonesian and Malaysian authorities are keeping a close eye on local supporters of the hard-line Middle East group.
Citizens of the tiny African nation say they're increasingly anxious of the fallout after alleged coup.
A humanitarian crisis and a budget crisis converge in the heart of the human smuggling corridor in Texas.
join our mailing list