[QODLink]
Middle East
Iraq demands extradition of 'fugitive' VP
Tareq al-Hashemi says he has right to constitutional immunity, as Baghdad demands Qatar hand him over to face trial.
Last Modified: 02 Apr 2012 14:39
Tareq al-Hashemi denies charges made by Baghdad that he ran death squads targeting Shia pilgrims [EPA]

Baghdad has demanded that Doha hand over Tareq al-Hashemi, who is accused of  running a death squad, and who arrived in the Gulf state from Iraq's semi-autonomous Kurdistan region where he has been living since December.

Hussain al-Shahristani, Iraq's deputy prime minister, said at a news conference in Baghdad on Monday that Qatar's decision to host Hashemi, the top Sunni official in Iraq's government, was "unacceptable".

"Qatar should review its position and send al-Hashemi back to Iraq so that he stands trial," Shahristani said.

Hashemi disputes the validity of Baghdad's extradition request, saying he enjoys constitutional immunity and has not been convicted.

"Why do they demand that Qatar extradite me?... Officials in Kurdistan have responded to a similar request by telling them that I have immunity according to Article 93 [of the Iraqi constitution]," said Hashemi told reporters in Doha, the Qatari capital.

He has denied the charges against him, saying they are "politically motivated". Hashemi told Al Jazeera in December that he never fled Baghdad for Kurdistan.

Hashemi said he was willing to return and stand trial if he had a guarantee that a "minimum requirement of justice is available".

Doha arrival

After arriving in Doha, Hashemi met Qatari Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani to discuss "relations between the two brotherly countries and developments in the region", according to Qatari state news agency QNA.

QNA added that he was to meet Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassem bin Jabr Al Thani, before visiting unnamed other countries and returning to Kurdistan.

Shahristani also said Kurdistan, where Hashemi had been staying since charges were issued against him in December, had committed a "clear challenge to law and justice" by allowing him to leave Iraq.

Baghdad had demanded that Kurdistan hand over Hashemi to face justice, but the region declined to oblige.

The row is the latest sign of worsening ties between the central government and Kurdish authorities in Arbil, with the two sides arguing over disputed territory in north Iraq, dozens of energy contracts awarded by Kurdistan, and  Kurdish claims that Baghdad is consolidating power.

Nouri al-Maliki, Iraq's prime minister, told a news conference on Sunday that Hashemi "is wanted in a member country of the Arab League, and he should not be received, especially under the title of vice president".

The accusations were leveled against Hashemi the day after US forces withdrew from Iraq in December 2011, and have resulted in a worsening political feud.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.