[QODLink]
Middle East
Iran's conservatives prepare for elections
Reformists call for boycott of Friday's parliamentary elections, which some see as battle between conservatives.
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 17:57

Iranians will go to the polls on Friday for the first time since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was re-elected in 2009.

Thousands of supporters of reform candidate Mir-Hussein Mousavi protested that result, sparking months of unrest across the Islamic Republic. Many reformist politicians and their supporters are now calling for a boycott of Friday’s elections.

"I won't vote because in the last election I didn’t get my rights,” Mohammed Bagheri, a resident of Tehran, told Al Jazeera. "And those who did protest the result were faced with batons or imprisonment."

Others feel they must obey the call from Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and vote to send a message that Iranian democracy is strong.

“Yes we have problems, but I am a nationalist and we need to vote to show our enemies we are unified,” said Mariam Zafari, a resident of Tehran.

Whatever the outcome, many consider Friday’s parliamentary elections to be a battle within the country's conservative camp.

“It is an internal struggle jockeying for power between Ahmadinijad and the Supreme Leader," Sadegh Zibakalam, a professor at Tehran University, told Al Jazeera

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.