Syria's uprising hurts Lebanese economy

From tourist bookings to currency exchange, trade and traffic between the neighbours have borne the brunt of the unrest.

    The international border is still open between Lebanon and Syria, but the volume of traffic and trade has been reduced as a result of 11 months of violence in Syria.

    In exchange houses, where people can change the Syrian currency into Lebanese, the dealers say business is down by 80 per cent.

    Furthermore, tourist bookings are said to be down by about 25 per cent and taxi drivers say they rarely find any customers who want to go to Syria.

    Al Jazeera’s James Bays reports from Shtoura, a Lebanese town 30km away from the Syria border.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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