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Middle East
Bahraini boy killed in protest
Opposition group blames police after 14-year-old boy dies on being hit by tear gas canister in oil hub.
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2011 14:37

A 14-year-old Bahraini boy has died after being hit by a tear gas canister during clashes between anti-government protesters and security forces, the Gulf kingdom's main Shia opposition group al-Wefaq has said.

Activists blamed the police for the death of Ali Jawad Ahmad, who was among the protesters in the oil hub area of Sitra on Wednesday.

A police official told the state news agency BNA that the incident was being investigated, without saying how the boy was injured.

Bahrain has been in turmoil for the past few months since protests by the dominant Shia community broke out, demanding great freedom and political rights.

More than 30 people have been killed since the protests began in February inspired by other uprisings across the Arab world.

Click here for more of Al Jazeera's coverage on Bahrain

More than 70 per cent of Bahrain's population is Shia but claim widespread discrimination by the ruling al-Khalifa Sunni dynasty.

Small scale clashes between police and mostly Shia demonstrators have become a near nightly event in the tense Gulf nation since authorities lifted emergency rule in June.

King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa has offered compensation to victims of the crackdowns in February, but says protest-related trials will continue.

In July Bahrain's leaders opened reconciliation talks, but the country's main Shia party walked out and threatened to stage further protests.

An independent fact-finding panel is investigating alleged rights abuses in Bahrain and is expected to release its findings at the end of October.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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