[QODLink]
Middle East
Israeli leaders reject Palestinian unity deal
Israeli leaders rule out talks with any Palestinian government including Hamas after rival factions agree unity deal.
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2011 20:21

Israeli leaders have ruled out negotiations with any Palestinian government that includes Hamas following a  Palestinian unity deal between rivals Hamas and Fatah.

Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, convened his security cabinet on Thursday, while Israeli President Shimon Peres called the rapprochement a "grave mistake that will prevent the establishment of a Palestinian state and will sabotage chances of peace and stability in the region".


Al Jazeera speaks to Khaleda Jarrar, a member of the PFLP, about what the unity agreement between Fatah and Hamas might actually mean. 

In an interview with Israeli military radio, Avigdor Lieberman, Israel's foreign minister, said the Palestinian deal had "crossed a red line" for Israel.

The comments come a day after Hamas and Fatah reached an initial unity deal in Cairo to end a four-year-old dispute that left Fatah controlling the West Bank and Hamas controlling Gaza. The Palestinians claim both territories for a future independent state.

The Egyptian-brokered deal, which took many by surprise, has revived hopes of ending bitter infighting that weakened the Palestinians politically and killed dozens in violent clashes and crackdowns.

The Palestinian plan calls for the formation of a joint caretaker government to prepare the way for elections next year. The Palestinians say the move is a step toward independence.

Prospects for peace

Khaleda Jarrar, a member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, told Al Jazeera that the latest development represented an opportunity for Palestinians.

"I think it is a good opportunity for reconciliation, especially with the Arab revolutions around and the Palestinian youth movement which has started to pressure both Fatah and Hamas to really put an end to the divisions.

"This time we hope that it will be a real reconciliation, it will work because of the changes [in the region] and the internal pressure from the Palestinian people," she said.

With a breakdown in peace talks with Israel, the Palestinians have been campaigning to get the United Nations to recognise Palestinian statehood in September, with or without a peace deal.

Peres said he feared Hamas would ultimately take over the West Bank after a Palestinian election and that the influence of Iran, which supports Hamas would be strengthened as a result.

But Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, stressed he would retain control over foreign policy.

He added that he remained ready to talk peace with Netanyahu if Israel halted its settlement construction on occupied lands and said the caretaker government would not include Hamas activists.

"The people will be independents, technocrats, not affiliated with any factions,'' Abbas told a group of Israeli businessmen and retired security chiefs.

He said the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO), which he heads and to which Hamas does not belong, would still be responsible for "handling politics, negotiations".

"Dislike, agree or disagree (with Hamas) -- they're our people. You, Mr Netanyahu (are) our partner," Abbas, speaking in English, told his Israeli audience.

Greeted with caution

The UN's Mideast envoy, Robert Serry, and European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton greeted the unity deal with caution, stressing the need to promote peace.

"We will study the detail of this agreement and discuss with colleagues in the EU and in the region,'' Ashton said.

Saeb Erekat, the chief Palestinian negotiator, said Palestinian unity would promote peace.

"Those who want peace and want democracy must support Palestinian reconciliation,'' he said.

Rivalries between the two Palestinian factions began in 2006 after Hamas won parliamentary elections in Gaza and the West Bank. A short-lived unity government collapsed into civil war the following year, and Hamas seized power in Gaza.

The Palestinian factions are set to meet next week in Egypt and the official signing ceremony will take place before May 10, said Azzam al-Ahmad, head of the Fatah delegation.

Israel has held peace talks with the Fatah-led government. But those negotiations have been frozen since September, with Abbas refusing to negotiate while Israel expands settlements in the West Bank.

Husam Zomlot, the Fatah spokesperson, said Abbas is embarking on a new strategy. "But of course he is not waging a war against either Israel or the West,'' he added.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
Treatment for autism in the region has progressed, but lack of awareness and support services remains a challenge.
join our mailing list