Mubarak to be moved to military hospital

Egypt's top prosecutor orders the transfer after medical exams showed that the ex-leader is stable enough for the move.

    Hosni Mubarak, currently in hospital, is scheduled to remain in detention until April 28 [AFP]

    Egypt's prosecutor general has ordered that Hosni Mubarak, the former president, be moved from his hospital in a Red Sea resort town to a military medical facility.

    Sunday's announcement is the latest in a string of setbacks for the former strongman, who is held on suspicion of corruption and violence against protesters in the uprising that toppled him.

    Mubarak was originally supposed to be moved to Cairo's Tora prison hospital, but it was deemed not yet ready to receive him, a spokesman for the prosecutor general, Abdel-Maguid Mahmoud, said in a statement posted on the prosecutor's Facebook page.

    Instead, the former president will stay in a military hospital until the prison facility is ready.

    "The public prosecutor addressed the interior minister, informing him to take the necessary steps to move the former president ... to a military hospital, to implement a custody order," the statement said.

    A report by a top forensic medical official said Mubarak could be moved without endangering his health, as long as he was given appropriate medical treatment.

    Mubarak's two sons are also being investigated for corruption allegations, and for their role in the shooting of protesters during the 18 days of demonstrations against their father's rule.

    Mubarak is scheduled to stay in custody until April 28, but his detention will most likely be extended.

    Thousands of Egyptians had demanded that Mubarak be placed in a prison compound, where his sons and many of his former ministers and officials are housed, instead of staying in hospital.

    The detention of Mubarak, his sons and many of their top allies was a key demand for the pro-democracy protesters.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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