Mubarak name to be removed from public places

Court orders that Hosni and Suzanne Mubarak's names be removed from all public places, including schools and streets.

    The names of Hosni (right), Suzanne (centre) and Gamal (left) Mubarak adorn many public places in Egypt [EPA/File]

    An Egyptian court has ordered the names of Hosni Mubarak, the country's former president, and his wife Suzanne, to be removed from all public places, including streets and parks.

    Judge Mohammad Hassan Omar ordered on Thursday that Mubarak's name and picture be removed from sport fields, streets, schools, libraries and other public establishments, according to the state-run al-Ahram newspaper.

    Currently, various public spaces, including squares, streets and about 500 public schools bear the names of either Hosni, Suzanne or Gamal Mubarak.

    The case had been filed by Samir Sabry, a lawyer, who had requested the court to have Mubarak's name replaced with the names of protesters who died during Egypt's popular uprising.

    The group of lawyers who Sabry represented also asked that the Egyptian flag be hung in state institutions and public places instead of the pictures of the former president.

    Clashes between pro- and anti-Mubarak demonstrators have been reported outside the court where the case was being heard on several days of hearings, though no such clashes occured on Thursday, when the verdict was announced, Rawya Rageh, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Cairo, said.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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