Christians targeted in Iraq attacks

A string of roadside bombs in Baghdad kills at least three people and leaves another 24 injured.

    At least 14 roadside bombs exploded across the city on Wednesday [AFP]

    A series of bomb and mortar attacks targeting Christians have killed three people and injured 24 others in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, according to police sources.

    Attackers detonated at least 14 roadside bombs in predominantly Christians areas within a two-hour period on Wednesday morning and a mortar round struck in the southern Doura district.

    "These operations, which targeted Christians, came as a continuation of the [October 31] attack that targeted the Salvation church," an Iraqi interior ministry source said.

    The official referred to the October 31 attack that killed more than 50 people at a Catholic cathedral in the capital.

    Al-Qaeda claimed responsibility for that attack and has threatened more violence against the Christian community.

    'Christians fleeing'

    Al Jazeera's Rawya Rageh, reporting from Baghdad, said Christians in Iraq have been a typical target of al-Qaeda fighters following the US-led invasion in March 2003.

    "We have seen Christians fleeing Iraq between 2004 and 2006. Their numbers now are down to a third," she said.

    "This is a stepped-up attack to revive the chaos that has affected the Christian community in the past."

    Younadem Kana, a Christian parliamentarian, condemned the violence and blamed police and military for failing to protect Christians despite boosting security measures at churches around the capital.

    "These attacks are not targeting only Christians, but also the government that has promised to protect the Christians," Kana said.

    He said Wednesday's bombings exposed "grave flaws in the structure and the work of Iraq's security forces," and that attacks will continue as long as the country remains without a government that represents all Iraqis.

    Tensions have been running high since the inconclusive parliamentary elections in March left Shia, Sunni and Kurdish political factions rallying support for a new government and raising fears of renewed violence.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Why some African Americans are moving to Africa

    Escaping systemic racism: Why I quit New York for Accra

    African-Americans are returning to the lands of their ancestors as life becomes precarious and dangerous in the USA.

    What happens when the US government shuts down?

    The US government has shut down. What happens next?

    US federal government begins partial shutdown after Senate blocks short-term spending bill. What happens next?

    Why is the West praising Malala, but ignoring Ahed?

    Why is the West praising Malala, but ignoring Ahed?

    Is an empowered Palestinian girl not worthy of Western feminist admiration?