CNN sacking over Fadlallah tweet

Middle East editor dismissed after saying she "respected" late Lebanese Shia leader.

    Fadlallah was accused of supporting terrorism yet known for progressive views on women [AFP]

    Nasr has apologised for the remark, describing it as a "error of judgement" to praise Fadlallah without any context, although she said she had been referring to his "pioneering" stance on women's rights.

    Fadlallah was branded a terrorist by some Western governments, but issued religious edicts banning so-called honour killings of women and enshrining the right of women to defend themselves from domestic abuse.

    In a blog posting after the incident, Nasr wrote that Fadlallah was "revered across borders yet designated a terrorist. Not the kind of life to be commenting about in a brief tweet. It's something I deeply regret".

    CNN management decided that Nasr, who had worked at the company for 20 years in mainly off-screen roles, should leave her job. "We have decided that she will be leaving the company," said a company memo circulated on Wednesday.

    Fadlallah was a divisive figure who was often described as the "spiritual guide" of Hezbollah, the Shia Lebanese political party. However, he never held a role within the organisation.

    He did support some of its actions, endorsing suicide attacks against Israel and was placed on a terrorist blacklist by the US.

    But his stance on women's rights and criticism of suicide attacks that targeted civilians led to him being condemned by conservative Islamic scholars who did not agree with his more moderate views.

     

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.