[QODLink]
Middle East
Sale of Dubai property bonds frozen
Market drops after Nakheel property developer asks Nasdaq to stop trading its bonds.
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2009 12:08 GMT
Stocks fell as soon as markets opened
in Dubai on Monday [AFP]

Nakheel, Dubai's property developer and part of the heavily-indebted Dubai World conglomerate, has asked Nasdaq, a US stock exchange, to stop trading its bonds.

The bonds have been taken off the Dubai bourse, Nasdaq said on their website.

Markets in Dubai, part of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), had fallen 7.3 per cent by the end of trading on Monday after the Eid al-Adah holidays.

Some major securities, including the construction and banking shares, fell to almost the 10 per cent maximum allowed.

Dubai World, the emirate's investment arm, announced on Wednesday that it would seek a six-month freeze on debt repayments of almost $60 billion, prompting concerns about its economic health.

'Worrying signs'

Al Jazeera's Dan Nolan, reporting from Dubai, said: "It has been a bad day here. The main bourse dropped 5.6 per cent instantly.

In depth
 Blog: Is Dubai up a creek without a paddle?
 Video: Dubai's future
 Video: Dubai World going bust?
"Analysts said before they opened that anything more than a three per cent drop would be a disaster.

"But others are pleased that it is not the full 10 per cent drop, which was certainly possible.

"Selling orders are far outnumbering buying orders and that is of great concern.

"It is certainly worrying signs at the stock market.

"There are concerns that there will be another large decrease on the stock market tomorrow. But hopes are that it will increase next week."

Abu Dhabi hit

Shares in the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange, another of the UAE's seven emirates, dropped by 7.4 per cent early on Monday, due to Dubai's debt crisis.

Abu Dhabi, the oil-rich capital of the UAE, said on Sunday that would shore up Dubai's finances on a case-by-case basis, while the UAE said that it would offer emergency support to the region's banks.

Abu Dhabi has already provided $15 billion in assistance to Dubai this year.

Nakheel said that it wanted to halt trading in its three Islamic bonds, or sukuk, until it can provide the market with a complete picture of its restructuring plans.

The bonds are worth $5.25 billion.

Asian markets rose on Monday between 1.7 and 2.7 per cent on average, with bank and construction shares, big losers last week, leading the turnaround.

Global stock markets had taken a nosedive last Friday, triggered by news of Dubai's request for a debt repayment freeze.

However, Monday's tentative recovery came as investors' nerves steadied on hopes that the fallout from a potential default will be limited.

Francis Lun, general manager of Fullbright Securities in Hong Kong, told Al Jazeera: "A lot of Chinese companies are major contractors in the Middle East.

"Now that a crisis has hit Dubai World, I think that many of these construction companies will have to wind up their operations in the Middle East. So it will be a big hit for them."

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
A handful of agencies that provide tours to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea say business is growing.
A political power struggle masquerading as religious strife grips Nigeria - with mixed-faith couples paying the price.
The current surge in undocumented child migrants from Central America has galvanized US anti-immigration groups.
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
join our mailing list