[QODLink]
Middle East
'Al-Qaeda members' flee Iraq jail
Tikrit, Saddam's hometown, under curfew and manhunt launched following prison break.
Last Modified: 24 Sep 2009 09:37 GMT
 

At least 15 senior al-Qaeda members have escaped from a prison in Tikrit, Iraqi officials said, with authorities locking down the city as they search for fugitives.

Major-General Abdul-Karim Khalaf, an Iraqi military spokesman, said on Thursday that six of the escaped inmates are considered dangerous.

Police sources told Al Jazeera that all of the men are charged with killing civilians and attacking security forces in the province in Salahiddien, north of Baghdad.

They added that one of the prisoners, who has been sentenced to death, was re-arrested near the jail.

The prisoners are said to have escaped through a window space half a metre square.

The break-out is not the first time al-Qaeda members have escaped from jail, suggesting the prisoners received outside assistance.

Al-Qaeda are believed to pay up to $20,000 for someone who can help to free their senior leaders from jails.

A curfew was imposed on the city after the escape, which occurred on Wednesday night.

Authorities are distributing wanted posters with photos of the fugitives and are running checkpoints around Tikrit, the hometown of Saddam Hussein, the deposed Iraqi leader.

The city is about 130km north of Baghdad, the Iraqi capital.

 

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
Amid vote audit and horse-trading, politicians of all hues agree a compromise is needed to avoid political instability.
join our mailing list