[QODLink]
Middle East
Bus bombings kill Iraqi civilians
Two explosions in the southern city of Kut kill at least 11 people.
Last Modified: 24 Aug 2009 20:13 GMT

Sticky bombs were said to have been
attached to the two buses [AFP]

Bombs on two buses in southern Iraq have exploded, killing at least 11 people and injuring another 25.

Police said that all of the casualties in Monday's blasts in the city of Kut, 175km southeast of Baghdad, were civilians.

Mohammed Fadhil, a police lieutenant, said: "Sticky bombs were attached to two buses and 10 people were killed.

"Women and children are among the casualties."

Sticky bombs are small bombs or grenades stuck to targets with magnets or tape and then detonated. They can be attached to fuel tanks on vehicles to cause maximum damage. 

Police said that the first bomb exploded at about 2.30pm (11:30GMT) 15km to the north of Kut, the regional capital of Wasit province. At least eight people were killed in the blast.

The second explosion took place about 30 minutes later 40km north of the city killing at least two people.

Doubts have surfaced over the ability of Iraqi security forces to keep control after attacks in Baghdad, the capital, last week killed at least 95 people and left about 600 people wounded.

The attacks were the worst day of violence in Iraq for 18 months and came after US forces withdrew from urban centres last June and ahead of their planned complete withdrawal by the end of 2011.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
The world's newest professional sport comes from an unlikely source: video games.
The group's takeover of farms in Qaraqosh, 30km from Mosul, has caused fear among residents, and a jump in food prices.
Protests and online activism in recent months have brought a resurgence of ethnic Oromo nationalism in Ethiopia.
Chemotherapy is big business, but some US doctors say it could be overused and are pushing for cheaper and better care.
Amid vote audit and horse-trading, politicians of all hues agree a compromise is needed to avoid political instability.
join our mailing list