[QODLink]
Middle East
Iraq jails 'Bush shoe-thrower'
Journalist who hurled shoes at then US president sentenced to three years.
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2009 22:24 GMT

Al-Zaidi's defence team said the charge did not apply as Bush was not on an official visit

An Iraqi journalist who threw his shoes at George Bush, then US president, has been given a three-year jail sentence after pleading not guilty to assaulting a foreign head of state.

The sentencing of Muntadher al-Zaidi, 30, by the Central Criminal Court in Baghdad on Thursday, was announced by Al-Baghdadiya television, his employer.

The journalist, who became a hero to many Iraqis after the December 14 incident, arrived at the court under a heavy police escort.

Judge Abdulamir Hassan al-Rubaie said he had taken into consideration that al-Zaidi is young and it was his first offence, the defence lawyers said.

Packed courtroom

There was standing room only at the courtroom on the edge of Baghdad's Green Zone as some 200 family members, reporters and lawyers crowded in.

In video


Iraqi journalist jailed for Bush shoe attack

Al-Rubaie later cleared the court before returning his verdict.

Asked if he was innocent, al-Zaidi responded: "Yes, my reaction was natural, just like any Iraqi (would have done)."

Bush was speaking on December 14 at a joint news conference in Baghdad with Nuri al-Maliki, the Iraqi prime minister, when al-Zaidi hurled his shoes at him.

The shoes narrowly missed Bush, who later brushed the incident aside.

As well as throwing the shoe, al-Zaidi shouted "It is the farewell kiss, you dog", before security forces wrestled him to the ground.

He later said he had been beaten and tortured in custody.

Shoe-hurling is considered an especially grave insult in the Arab and Muslim world and al-Zaidi had risked up to 15 years in jail on the charge of aggression against a foreign head of state.

'Prisoner of war'

After the verdict on Thursday, al-Zaidi's 25-strong defence team emerged from the  courtroom to scenes of chaos. Several family members screamed: "It's an American court ... sons of dogs."

One of his brothers, Uday, said the decision was political.

"This is a political court. Muntadhar is being treated like a prisoner of war. He is not a normal prisoner ... This decision has been taken by the prime minister's office."

Al-Zaidi shouted "Iraq, long live Iraq" after the verdict was read out, Yahia Attabi, a defence lawyer, said.

"We expected the decision because under the Iraqi criminal code he was charged with assaulting a foreign leader on an official visit."

Appeal planned

Attabi said al-Zaidi will appeal the decision.

The family said they would not only appeal but also press ahead with plans to bring torture charges against Bush, al-Maliki and his bodyguards at a human rights court abroad.

Ehiya al-Sadi, the chief defence lawyer, had argued that his client's motives were "honourable".

"He was only expressing his feelings. What he could see was the blood of Iraqis at his feet when he watched the US president speaking about his achievements in Iraq."

Al-Sadi also argued that although Iraqi law considered it an attack on a visiting head of state, "[al-Zaidi's] throwing of the shoe did not cause any injury or damage ... His goal was to insult Bush for the pain Iraqis have suffered".

Al-Zaidi's account

The trial opened on February 19 but was adjourned to determine the nature of Bush's December visit.

Al-Zaidi told the court last month that he had been outraged and was unable to control his emotions when Bush started speaking to the media.

"I had the feeling that the blood of innocent people was dropping on my feet during the time that he was smiling and coming to say bye-bye to Iraq with a dinner.

"So I took the first shoe and threw it but it did not hit him. Then spontaneously I took the second shoe but it did not hit him  either. I was not trying to kill the commander of the occupation forces of Iraq."

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.