[QODLink]
Middle East
Iraq demands US withdrawal timeline
Call for timetable comes as fighting and bomb attacks kill at least 11 people.
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2008 17:57 GMT
Fighting and bomb attacks across Iraq killed
at least 11 people on Sunday [AFP]

The US must provide a "clear timeline" to withdraw its troops from Iraq as part of an agreement allowing them to operate in Iraq beyond this year, Hoshiyar Zebari, Iraq's foreign minister, has said.

His comments on Sunday are the strongest public assertion yet that Iraq is demanding a timeline for US withdrawal.

The Reuters news agency quoted Zebari saying an agreement, including the timeline, was "very close" and would probably be presented to the Iraqi parliament in early September.

George Bush, the US president, has long resisted setting a timeline for withdrawal, but in July the White House began speaking of a general "time horizon" and "aspirational goals" to withdraw.

Iraq's leaders have become more confident of their ability to provide security as the country has become safer, but Zebari's comments came as fighting and bomb attacks across Iraq killed at least 11 people, including a US soldier.

Roadside bombings

The US soldier and four other people were killed in an attack involving a roadside bomb, a suicide bomber and small arms fire in Tarmiya, 25km north of Baghdad, the US military said.

It said two US soldiers, three Iraqi policemen and 18 other people were also wounded in the fighting.

In another attack, a suicide attacker blew up a bomb-laden minibus, killing at least three people and wounding 20 others in the town of Khanaqin, a security source said.

In Baghdad, two separate roadside bomb attacks killed at least six people, including one Iraqi soldier, and wounded at least 17 others.

Another roadside bombing targeting a private security company wounded at least four people.

Despite the violence, Iraq has taken an increasingly assertive stance in negotiations with the US after Nuri al-Maliki, the prime minister, ordered cracked downs on fighters earlier in the year.

But US military commanders say they worry that a hasty withdrawal could allow violence to resume.

Iraqi politics have also been paralysed by a dispute over the northern city of Kirkuk, which Kurds claim as the capital of their autonomous homeland.

The issues threatens to stoke ethnic tensions between the city's Kurds, Arabs and ethnic Turkmen.

The quarrel scuppered a law needed to allow provincial elections across the country, despite intensive lobbying by the US and UN to reach a deal.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
More than one-quarter of Gaza's population has been displaced, causing a humanitarian crisis.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Muslim charities claim discrimination after major UK banks began closing their accounts.
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Featured
Thousands of Houthi supporters have called for the fall of Yemen's government. But what do the Houthis really want?
New ration reductions and movement restrictions have refugees from Myanmar anxious about their future in Thailand.
US lawyers say poor translations of election materials disenfranchise Native voters.
US drones in Pakistan have killed thousands since 2004. How have leaders defended or decried these deadly planes?
Residents count the cost of violence after black American teenager shot dead by white Missouri police officer.
join our mailing list