Iraqis divided over oil contracts

Ordinary people tell Al Jazeera what they feel about the oil deals.


    Iraq is seeking funds and expertise for developing its oil fields [Gallo/Getty]

      
    Iraq has announced it will give contracts to foreign energy firms to develop its oil fields. The move has evoked mixed responses from Iraqis. Here is a sample of opinions:

    Dildar Ahmed, taxi driver

    "We wish foreign companies would come to invest here. But they should work under the regional government so that they don't fix prices.

    "We need these companies to work here and give us cheap fuel. Importing fuel has made prices here very high."

    Baha Muhammed, taxi driver

    "We can't continue working as taxi drivers because the price of fuel is very expensive. I can't use the air-conditioner in my car because the fuel quality is no good. High-quality fuel is too expensive for me.

    "We need foreign companies to come here and give us our own fuel so that prices go down."

    Safeer Hannoon Atyeh Al-Saadi

    "The oil should be nationalised; the Iraqi oil should be for Iraqis. Foreigners should not be in a position to invest in our oil - we are as qualified as they are."

    Haydar

    "If we had honest Iraqis in charge I would support them. But the people in control don't have clean hands.

    "That's why I support the foreign companies, despite the fact they steal the oil. But they don't do it as much as the Iraqis do."

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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