[QODLink]
Middle East
Supporters mark Saddam birthday
Ex-Iraqi leader extolled through poems and songs in a ceremony by his grave.
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2008 15:21 GMT
Women and children crowd around Saddam's
tomb on his birth anniversary [EPA]


Sunni Arab supporters of Saddam Hussein have marked the anniversary of the executed Iraqi leader's birthday with poems and songs of praise by his grave.
 
Saddam was hanged for "crimes against humanity" in an execution criticised by the international community.
A few dozen relatives and loyalists participated in Monday's ceremony by Saddam's tomb in the village of Awja near the central city of Tikrit, capital of Salaheddin province.
 
"We are celebrating the anniversary because we love Saddam, who was the symbol of Iraq's unity," a Saddam loyalist said.
Musical tribute
 
Several poets gave recitals in praise of Saddam, while a group of children carrying roses and pictures of the leader sang along.
 
"We are celebrating the birth anniversary of president Saddam Hussein. It is our way of rejecting the occupation and the sectarianism that has come along with it," Shah Hamid al-Juburi, who heads a children's organisation in the province, said.

Mahmud al-Tikriti, 35, the caretaker of the hall which houses Saddam's tomb, said he wished he could hold daily celebrations.

"Our love for Saddam and our loyalty to him inspired us to celebrate. We wish that we could celebrate every day to remember him," he said.

In Tikrit, there were no ceremonies to mark the anniversary of Saddam's death.

However, residents put up two posters on the city's main mosque, which under Saddam's rule used to bear his name.

"April 28 reminds us of the birthday of Saddam, the Arabian knight," said one poster.

"Mercy and compassion be upon the heroic leader on his birthday," said the other.

Feelings of nostalgia

Sunni Arabs from the Tikrit region dominated Saddam's regime and there is widespread nostalgia in the area for the leader's rule.

The nostalgia is not shared by the country's Shia majority but five years after Saddam's overthrow the celebrations for him in Awja, the late president's home village, sparked little hostility.

"It is the sign of democracy in Iraq," Abbas Abdul Hussein, a Shia employee of a private sector company in Baghdad, said.

"People are free to celebrate the birthday of a man like Saddam who brutalised this country for decades."

Born poor in what was then just a mud-hut village on April 28, 1937, Saddam rose to Iraq's highest office, attaining a wealthy lifestyle.

He was hanged on December 30, 2006, after an Iraqi court found him guilty of "crimes against humanity" for ordering the execution of 148 Shia Muslims after an assassination attempt in 1982 against him in Dujail, north of Baghdad.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.