Kuwait has witnessed a series of political crises that has led to the resignation of three governments over the past two years.
Last week, the government approved the law and said a decree would be issued in the absence of parliament which was dissolved last month amid a political crisis.
Kuwaiti civil organisations, political groups and candidates in the elections have called the law a "flagrant violation of the constitution" which allows greater freedom to hold public meetings.
Two years the country's constitutional court revoked the previous law on public gatherings saying it was unconstitutional, thus allowing citizens to hold meetings without prior permission.
Under the new law, the organisers of public gatherings must apply to the interior ministry, which has the right to deny permission.
It also allows police and security forces to disperse public meetings if participants break the law.