Israel 'allows' Jenin police force

Palestinians say they have not decided where to send the Jordanian-trained officers.

     About 2,000 Palestinian security personnel
    are already deployed in Jenin [Reuters]
    Speaking to reporters at an Israeli army base in the West Bank, Ehud Barak said he would discuss the issue with Salam Fayyad, the Palestinian prime minister, at a meeting on Wednesday.

    Al Jazeera understands that the Palestinians had planned to send some police officers, who were trained as part of a US-funded programme, to Jenin and Bethlehem.

    Officers trained in Jordan have already been deployed in Nablus where they have been credited with good results against criminals but less success against the armed groups.

    Balata incursion

    Barak's statement came as the Israeli military moved into the Balata refugee camp in the West Bank to arrest a Palestinian suspect. Local youths threw stones at the soldiers during the incursion.

    Israel conducts frequent military raids against Palestinian fighters in Jenin and the surrounding area. But local security officials say that they have largely restored calm in the town with around 2,000 officers.

    Your Views

    Can Hamas and Fatah be reconciled?

    Send us your views

    "We didn't apply for more forces in Jenin. We have enough," Diab al-Ali, a senior Palestinian security commander in the West Bank, told the Associated Press.

    "The only demand we have for Jenin is that Israel hand the city over to us."

    Barak also said he was considering other measures to bolster the Palestinians and improve the negotiating climate.

    "We're considering a series of steps that won't hurt security," he said. Among them are allowing Palestinian forces to obtain additional vehicles and "non-lethal" weapons, such as rubber bullets, and helping Palestinian businessmen move freely between the West Bank and Israel.

    However, Barak has made similar pledges in the past without taking action and on Monday, he rejected a key Palestinian demand, saying he would not remove any of the hundreds of Israeli military checkpoints in the West Bank.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Assassinating Kim Jong-un could go so wrong

    Assassinating Kim Jong-un could go so wrong

    The many ways in which the assassination of the North Korean leader could lead to a total disaster.

    Lebanon has a racism problem

    Lebanon has a racism problem

    The problem of racism in Lebanon goes beyond xenophobic attitudes towards Syrian and Palestinian refugees.

    The life and death of Salman Rushdie, gentleman author

    The life and death of Salman Rushdie, gentleman author

    The man we call 'Salman Rushdie' today is not the brilliant author of the Satanic Verses, but a Picassoesque imposter.