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Middle East
Kuwait cabinet resigns en masse
Resignation comes after recent calls on the emir to sack entire cabinet.
Last Modified: 17 Mar 2008 18:27 GMT
The second session of parliament is inaugurated [File:EPA]

Kuwaiti ministers have handed in their resignation en masse to the emirate's prime minister.
 
The official news agency KUNA reported on Monday that all cabinet members had approached Sheikh Nasser Al Mohammed Al Sabah, the prime minister, to resign.
The emir has faced recent calls to sack the government, appoint a new premier and hold early parliamentary polls in the oil-rich emirate that neighbours Iraq.
 
The agency did not say whether or not the resignations had been accepted.
Kuwait's government has been locked in a political battle with parliament, paralysing political life in the Gulf Arab country for much of the past year.
 
Parliament has repeatedly grilled ministers over their conduct, which has resulted in several resignations.
 
Big surprise
 
The emir, who has the last say in politics, has repeatedly urged deputies and the government to work together but to little avail.
 
Sa'ad Al-anayzi, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Kuwait, said the the resignation came as a big surprise.
 
"The current cabinet has weathered several crises before, but it seems they have reached a point where they cannot continue," he said.
 
Senior ministers have been holding off calls to resign amid growing unrest among Kuwaitis who are fretting that the government has done little to solve economic and social problems.
 
The emir might find it suitable to call an election, Al-anayzi said.
Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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