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Middle East
Qatar brokers Yemen peace deal
Sanaa and tribal fighters agree to revive deal to end insurgency.
Last Modified: 01 Feb 2008 16:33 GMT
Thousands of people have died in the uprising by Zaidi fighters that first broke out in 2004 [AFP]

The Yemeni government and followers of a rebel Shia leader have agreed to revive a peace deal in a bid to end an insurgency that has claimed thousands of lives.
 
A deal signed last year between Sanaa and the fighters, who are followers of Hussein al-Huthi, had not been implemented and sporadic fighting has since resumed in Yemen.
Helped by Qatari mediation, both sides on Friday signed a document in Doha containing procedures for the implementation of the reconciliation agreement reached last year.

"There has been agreement over an executive plan based on the previous ideas presented in the Qatari mediation," which led to a peace deal in June, Abdulmalik Saeed, Yemen's ambassador to Qatar, said on Friday.

 

Thousands of people have died in an uprising by tribal Zaidi fighters that first broke out in 2004 in the mountainous Saada province near the border with Saudi Arabia.

 

Their aim is to restore the Zaidi imamate, which was overthrown in a 1962 coup.

 

The fighters reject the regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh, the Yemeni president, branding it as illegitimate, although Saleh is himself a Zaidi.

  

A branch of Shia Islam, the Zaidis are a minority in mainly Sunni Yemen but form the majority in the northwest of one of the world's poorest countries.

 

Al-Huthi was killed by Yemeni security forces in September 2004 after starting an uprising.
Source:
Agencies
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