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Middle East
Tunis cancels Suha Arafat passport
Withdrawal of Tunisian nationality comes days after publication of a formal decree.
Last Modified: 14 Aug 2007 20:14 GMT
Yasser Arafat's widow had been granted
Tunisian citizenship in 2006 [AFP]

Tunisian authorities have decided to strip Suha Arafat, the widow of Yasser Arafat, the late Palestinian president, of her Tunisian nationality, Al Jazeera reports.
 
Officials announced the withdrawal on Tuesday, but a formal decree had also been published in the Tunisian Official Gazette at the beginning of the month.
Suha Arafat, who was granted Tunisian citizenship in 2006, had lived in a suburb of the Tunisian capital since the death of her husband in 2004.
 
Authorities at the Palestinian embassy in Tunis declined to comment on the matter.
Some reports attributed the decision to revoke her citizenship to a disagreement with some of her partners on projects in Tunisia, which had led to her departure to Malta.
 
The official decree did not disclose the reasons behind the decision, nor did it make reference to Zahwa, Arafat's daughter, who received citizenship along with her mother.
 
Born into a wealthy Christian family, Suha Arafat served as secretary to the Palestinian leader and they secretly married in 1990.
 
The Palestine Liberation Organisation, with Araft as its chairman, had its headquarters in the Tunisian capital for years after Israel's 1982 invasion of Lebanon, where the group had previously been based.
Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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