Egyptian gets 15 years for spying

Egyptian-Canadian man and three Israelis in absentia each sentenced to 15 years.

    Al-Attar's confession to spying for Israel was made under duress, his defence lawyer says [AFP]

    Confession

     

    Prosecutors say al-Attar confessed to taking payment from Israel to spy on Egyptians and Arabs in Turkey and Canada, using his position in the bank to obtain information on specific accounts.

     

    Al-Attar was also expected to approach potential recruits, according to prosecutors, who said he was paid $56,000 before he was arrested.

     

    Ibrahim el-Basyuni, al-Attar's defence lawyer, has said his client's confession was made under duress.

     

    The defendant told the court in an earlier session he confessed because he was tortured with electric shocks during interrogation.

     

    Al-Attar's alleged confession claimed he fled Egypt in 2001 after he was sentenced to three years in prison for issuing a bad money order, and that he later sought asylum with the UN refugee agency in Turkey.

     

    The confession also alleged al-Attar converted to Christianity in Istanbul before being sent to Canada, where he delivered spy reports about Christian Egyptians.

     

    Hani Hamoodah, prosecuting, insisted the defendant made the confession freely and without coercion.

     

    Mossad involvement

     

    The three Israelis convicted in absentia in the case, said to be Mossad agents, were each sentenced to 15 years in jail. 

     

    Israel has dismissed the case as a fabrication.

     

    In 1996, Egypt detained Azzam Azzam, an Israeli Arab textile worker, and sentenced him to 15 years in prison for spying for Israel.

     

    Egypt said Azzam passed messages in women's underwear using invisible ink.

     

    Both Azzam and Israel denied the charges. He was released after serving eight years as part of a deal that included the release of six Egyptian students in Israel.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    When somebody dies lonely and alone, Miyu Kojima steps in to clean their home and organise the mementos of their life.

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    The rise of the Orthodox Church in Russia appears unstoppable, write filmmakers Glen Ellis and Viktoryia Kolchyna who went to investigate the close ties between the church and Putin.

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    Much of India's media spurns a scoop about the son of PM Modi's right-hand man. Plus, NFL as platform for race politics.