[QODLink]
Middle East
Several die in Israel suicide blast
Three Palestinian groups, including al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, claim responsibility.
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2007 17:34 GMT
Monday's attack is the first suicide bombing
in Israel since last April 
[AP]
A suicide bomber has killed three people in Israel's southern resort town of Eilat, emergency services say.
 
The bomber blew himself up on Monday, killing three other people and wounding more, in a cafe-bakery in the Red Sea holiday town near the Jordanian and Egyptian borders.
Micky Rosenfeld, a spokesman for the police, said: "Three people and the bomber were killed."

A police officer in Eilat said on army radio: "This was a suicide bombing and the bomber is one of the dead. He apparently entered with a bag or an explosives belt and blew himself up inside the shop."
Your Views

"The only real solution is for everyone to live on the land as equals. In the end, everyone there will have to live together or they will all die together."

Hartsie, Boston, US

Send us your views

Ehud Olmert, the Israeli prime minister, said: "We will study this incident ... and we will draw the conclusions in order to direct our security officials to continue their battle without respite against the terrorists and their commanders."
 
Jacky Rowland, Al Jazeera's Jerusalem correspondent, said: "Israel as a whole has been put on a high state of alert now."
 
Bruno Stein, Eilat's police commander, said the police believe there could be more bombers in the town.
 
He said: "Our assumption is that it's not one bomber, and there might be more bombers in Eilat right now."
 
Claims of responsibility
 
Islamic Jihad, al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades and a previously unknown group calling itself the Army of Believers each said they carried out the attack.
 
Khaled al-Batsh, a senior Islamic Jihad leader, said the attack was "a natural response to the continued crimes by the Zionist enemy".
 
Spokesmen from Islamic Jihad and al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades claimed joint responsibility for the attack.
 
In a phone call to AFP offices in Gaza, the spokesmen named the suicide bomber as Mohammed Faisal al-Siksek, a twenty-one-year-old from the Al-Shujaiyah neighbourhood of Gaza City. The group had earlier said that he was from the West Bank.
 
The Jihad spokesman said al-Siksek belonged to the Islamist group but neither organisation specified how the bomber had managed to get from the Gaza Strip to Eilat, access to which is strictly controlled by Israel.
 
Islamic Jihad is not one of the Palestinian actors subject to a Gaza ceasefire agreed upon in November between Israel and some Palestinian groups.
 
The group has demanded that any truce also cover the occupied West Bank.
 
New offshoot
 
Nour Odeh, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Gaza, said: "Eyes are mainly looking towards the Islamic Jihad and a new offshoot of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades.
 
"Senior Islamic Jihad movement figures have been killed or detained in the past few weeks, and so Islamic Jihad in particular has threatened [a] response.
The bomber who struck the Eilat cafe-bakery
may have come in through Jordan [Reuters]

"[Palestinians] are expecting reprisals from Israel. So far we know that a ceasefire of sorts has been in place in the Gaza Strip between Palestinians and Israelis ... As for the West Bank, no such ceasefire exists.
 
"Some Palestinian groups may say that if the attacker came from the West Bank he would have been under no obligation to observe a ceasefire. Reprisals may come in Gaza, in the form of targeted assassinations [against Palestinian activists]."
 
Ismail Radwan, a Hamas spokesman, said the attack was a "natural response to the occupier's crimes against our people", although Hamas itself, which formed a Palestinian government last March, has not claimed a suicide bombing within Israel for nearly two years.
 
The attack is the first suicide bombing in Israel since last April when a suicide bomber killed 10 people in Tel Aviv.
Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
UNHCR says hundreds of people trapped in Yaloke town risk death if they are not evacuated to safety urgently.
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Featured
Long-standing dispute over Christian use of the word 'Allah' raises concerns about a very un-Merry Christmas.
The threat posed by ISIL has prompted thousands of young Kurds to join the PKK.
Baja California - with its own grim history of disappeared people - finds a voice in the fight against violence.
Russian feminist rockers fight system holding 700,000 - the world's largest per capita prison population after the US.
Weeks of growing protests against Muslims continue in Dresden with 15,000 hitting the streets last Monday.