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Middle East
Several die in Israel suicide blast
Three Palestinian groups, including al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, have claimed responsibility.
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2007 10:09 GMT
The attack is the first suicide bombing
in Israel since last April [AP]


A suicide bomber has killed three people in Israel's southern resort town of Eilat, emergency services say.
 
The bomber blew himself up on Monday, killing three other people and wounding more, in a cafe-bakery in the Red Sea holiday town near the Jordanian and Egyptian borders.
Micky Rosenfeld, a spokesman for the police, said: "Three people and the bomber were killed."

A police officer in Eilat said on army radio: "This was a suicide bombing and the bomber is one of the dead. He apparently entered with a bag or an explosives belt and blew himself up inside the shop."
Islamic Jihad, al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades and a previously unknown group calling itself the Army of Believers each said they carried out the attack.
 
Khaled al-Batsh, a senior Islamic Jihad leader, said the attack was "a natural response to the continued crimes by the Zionist enemy".
 
Islamic Jihad is not one of the Palestinian actors subject to a Gaza ceasefire agreed upon in November between Israel and some Palestinian groups.
 
The group has demanded that the truce also cover the occupied West Bank.
 
Bruno Stein, Eilat's police commander, said the police believed there could be more bombers in Eilat.
 
"Our assumption is that it's not one bomber, and there might be more bombers in Eilat right now," he said.
 
The attack is the first suicide bombing in Israel since last April when a suicide bomber killed 10 people in Tel Aviv.
Source:
Agencies
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