Tony Blair 'may have been terrorism target'

Suspect stopped with former UK prime minister's address in his car denies charges of preparing for acts of terrorism.

    Incedal was found with Blair's address in his car [EPA]
    Incedal was found with Blair's address in his car [EPA]

    A man charged with plotting terrorist attacks in the UK may have been planning to target Tony Blair, a court has heard.

    Prosecutors told the Old Bailey on Tuesday that Erol Incedal, 26, had the address of the former prime minister in his car when he was stopped for a traffic offence in September last year.

    The traffic stop happened a month before Incedal was arrested with another man, Mounir Rarmoul-Bouhadja, and charged with a number of terrorism-related offences.

    Prosecutor Richard Whittam told the jury of the September traffic stop: "In the car, a black Mercedes, detectives found a piece of paper with the address of former prime minister Tony Blair written on it. In the context of this case as a whole you may think it has some significance."

    Whittam said that the men were charged with preparing an attack against a limited number of individuals, an individual of significance or a more wide-ranging and indiscriminate attack such as the one in Mumbai in 2008.

    The trial also heard that the men were carrying documents relating to bomb-making when they were arrested.

    Incedal denies preparing acts of terrorism and collecting information useful to terrorism. The jury heard that Rarmoul-Bourhadja admitted possessing documents on bomb-making. 

    Prosecutors originally asked for the trial to be held in complete secrecy - an unprecedented move in modern British legal history.

    The request was denied. Instead, the trial will be heard in three parts - some in open court and others in secret. One part of the trial will be attended by journalists who will be banned from reporting the evidence they hear.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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