[QODLink]
Europe

Britain cuts EU migrants' access to welfare

The decision is latest in a series of moves by Prime Minister David Cameron to address voter concerns over immigration.

Last updated: 29 Jul 2014 01:06
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Cameron says he wants to cut net migration and target those who he says come to UK for benefits [Reuters]

British Prime Minister David Cameron has set out new welfare rules to cut European migrants' access to social security payments, marking the latest in a string of British measures aimed at addressing voters' concerns over immigration.

Writing in The Daily Telegraph newspaper, Cameron said that from November, migrants coming to Britain from the European Union to find work would be entitled to claim unemployment and child benefits for three months, rather than the previous six months.

We're ... making sure people come for the right reasons - which has meant addressing the magnetic pull of Britain's
benefits system.

- British Prime Minister David Cameron

Opinion polls show immigration is one of voters' biggest concerns going into a national election in 2015, fuelling a rise in eurosceptic sentiment that has helped the anti-EU UK Independence Party (UKIP) draw voters away from Cameron's Conservatives.

In a bid to stop voters defecting, Cameron has said he wants to cut net migration and has targeted those who he says come to  Britain solely to tap its benefits system.

"We're ... making sure people come for the right reasons - which has meant addressing the magnetic pull of Britain's benefits system," Cameron said.

He said that by restricting job seekers' welfare access to only three months he was sending a clear message to potential migrants: "You cannot expect to come to Britain and get something for nothing."

The opposition Labour party has criticised Cameron for not doing enough to stop low-skilled migrants driving wages down.

European criticism

Other rule changes introduced since January have included tightening the criteria for claimants and mandating longer waiting periods before migrants become eligible for payments. 

EU officials have in the past criticised Cameron's approach to immigration and said that there is no evidence to show migrants move to Britain to claim benefits.

Nevertheless, other European countries such as Germany have expressed sympathy with Cameron's concerns, and it is one of only a few policy areas where he has support for changes to EU rules.

In the face of eurosceptic sentiment within his own party and the wider electorate, Cameron has promised to renegotiate Britain's ties with the EU if he is re-elected, and then put the country's continuing membership to a public vote in 2017.

456

Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.