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Turkey's PM accuses Twitter of tax evasion

Erdogan threatens to "go after" micro-blogging site despite being forced to lift ban on it following court ruling.

Last updated: 12 Apr 2014 14:52
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Twitter was used to spread a number of damaging leaks implicating Erdogan's aides in graft [AFP]

Turkey's prime minister has accused Twitter of tax evasion, days after his government was forced to lift a ban it imposed on the micro-blogging site that was used to spread a  number of damaging leaks implicating his inner circle in corruption scandals.

"Twitter, YouTube and Facebook are international companies established for profit," Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in televised remarks on Saturday. "Twitter is at the same time a tax evader. We will go after it."

Erdogan's government on March 20 banned access to the social media site, sparking outrage among Turkey's NATO allies and international human rights groups who viewed it as a setback for democracy in the EU-hopeful country.

Ankara had to lift the ban on April 3 after its highest court ruled against it.

Erdogan again criticised the court verdict on Saturday. "We abided by the (court) ruling on (Twitter), but I say it again, I don't respect it," he said.

The ban had been widely circumvented by many of Turkey's almost 12 million Twitter users, who have instead sent tweets via text message or by adjusting their Internet settings.

Last week, the government said it would keep its block on YouTube in place despite two separate courts ordering it be lifted.

Erdogan, Turkey's prime minister for 11 years, ordered the Internet curbs in the lead-up to March 30 municipal election that his party won.

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